Bible studies at the White House aim to help Trump cabinet make good policies

Members of U.S. President Donald Trump's cabinet have reportedly been gathering every week for a Bible study at the White House which aims to help guide them in using their Christian faith to make good policies for the country.

(REUTERS / Larry Downing)The White House is seen from the South Lawn in Washington, May 15, 2012.

In a historic move, Capitol Ministries founder Ralph Drollinger started a formal weekly Bible study among Trump's executive Cabinet members, presumed to be a first in at least 100 years. Drollinger, who had already initiated similar gatherings in 40 state capitols, commends the attendees for being so teachable when it comes to learning God's Word, the Christian Broadcasting Network News detailed.

"These are godly individuals that God has risen to a position of prominence in our culture," Drollinger told CBN.

"I don't think Donald Trump has figured out that he chained himself to the Apostle Paul," he added. "It's the best Bible study that I've ever taught in my life. They are so teachable; they're so noble; they're so learned."

Among the regular attendees of the Trump Cabinet Bible study are Health Secretary Tom Price, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, Energy Secretary Rick Perry, CIA Director Mike Pompeo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, and Agriculture Secretary Sunny Perdue. Trump is also invited to the weekly gatherings and is given a copy of the lecture. Vice President Mike Pence, on the other hand, is a sponsor of the activity and is planning to join once his schedule allows him to.

News of the weekly Bible study at the White House broke just a couple of weeks after CNN reported that evangelical leaders gathered around Trump at the Oval Office and prayed over him. Liberty University's former senior vice president Johnnie Moore posted a photo of the president bowing his head in prayer while pastors prayed for him.

Moore told CNN that national faith leaders were invited to the Oval Office to meet with Trump and representatives from the Office of Public Liaison. They ended their meeting with a prayer for the president.

Evangelical leaders also prayed for former president Barack Obama, but Moore noted that praying for Trump was different. He said they did it in the "context of a real relationship."