Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster cannot advertise 'noodle Masses,' German court rules

The Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster cannot post advertisements of its "noodle Masses" at the entrance of a town in eastern Germany, a court has ruled on Aug. 2.

(WIKIMEDIA COMMONS / Joe Mabel)Flying Spaghetti Monster contingent getting ready for Summer Solstice Parade, Fremont, Seattle, Washington. 20 June 2009.

In Germany, Lutheran or Catholic churches normally post signs announcing the details of its services at the entrance of towns. The Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster, an organization that sees religion as intolerant, also wanted to be granted permission to put up similar signs in Templin, The Associated Press detailed.

However, the Brandenburg state court ruled that the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster cannot be granted the same rights that religious or philosophical communities have. According to the judges, the group's criticism of other people or organizations' beliefs is not classified as a philosophy.

The Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster, on the other hand, insists that it is a humanist group. It is planning to appeal against the ruling of the Brandenburg state court.

While there is no official count of how many members the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster has, pages related to it have garnered thousands of likes. Some of its members have won cases in which they fought for the same privilege that other religions enjoy, The Atlantic noted.

For instance, in Austria, a church leader named Niko Alm popularized the use of an overturned colander as a "religious headgear." He won the legal right to wear the accessory in his photo for official ID photos.

"Headgear is not allowed in driver's licenses except for religious reasons," said Alm. "So I invented a religious reason."

However, eight followers of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster in Russia were detained by authorities for conducting an illegal "pasta procession" in 2013. Nevertheless, Alm said he signed hundreds of colanders when he visited the country last year.

The Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster has its own deity which features spaghetti, two meatballs, and two eyes. Members of this group also observe a Sabbath, and its church in Brandenburg conducts weekly mass which uses noodles and beer instead of bread and wine.