Dallas pastor Robert Jeffress defends Trump against 'Fire and Fury' charges

First Baptist Church pastor Robert Jeffress has defended U.S. President Donald Trump against a controversial expose by Michael Wolff, saying Americans are glad that their leader is not "normal."

(REUTERS / Jonathan Ernst)U.S. President Donald Trump departs for travel to Utah from the White House in Washington, U.S. December 4, 2017.

Appearing on Fox News on Jan. 5, Pastor Jeffress criticized Wolff's book titled "Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House" and denied the author's charges that Trump did not care for winning in the U.S. elections and that his wife had been upset when he was elected. However, the Dallas-based pastor agreed with the book's account about Trump's not being "normal," Dallas News relayed.

"If there is a kernel of truth in this book, it is the charge that President Trump is not 'normal.' He isn't normal, which is why the American people put him in office to begin with," Pastor Jeffress said on Fox. "The American people were tired of a normal that said we ought to accept subpar economic growth, that we ought to accept ISIS as continuing reality, that our best days were behind us."

In addition, Jeffress said there were more Americans now who are thankful that their national leader is not "normal."

Earlier this month, Jeffress criticized the people who said Trump had caused a division among the evangelicals. He told American Family Radio that evangelicals who claimed that their values prohibited them from supporting Trump were hypocritical, saying personal piety had never been an indication of which presidential candidate a person was going to vote for, One News Now reported.

Moreover, Jeffress said Trump was not the cause of the evangelical divide, but he was only the one who exposed it. The pastor said the chasm between Christians who take Bible teachings seriously and their co-believers who do not has been growing.

In an interview on "Janet Mefferd Live," Jeffress mentioned that a lot of evangelicals had supported Ronald Reagan even though the latter had been married twice and was pro-abortion. The Dallas pastor called these people the "evangelical elite" who do not really embrace Christian values and were more concerned about immigration issues rather than the life of the unborn.