Bloodshed feared following allegations of state-sanctioned Christian persecution in Nigeria

Bloodshed could result after allegations of state-sanctioned persecution of Nigerian Christians surfaced, the International Society for Civil Liberties and the Rule of Law (Intersociety) has warned.

Intersociety's warning of a potential bloodshed comes after Open Doors chief executive officer Lisa Pearce alleged that Nigeria's political elite are helping the terror group Boko Haram and the Muslim Fulani herdsmen in persecuting Christians. In its report, the persecution watchdog said religion-motivated attacks almost doubled last year in the northern region, News 24 details.

(Reuters/Stringer)Relatives of victims of a gun attack mourn at the Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital in Nigeria's northern city of Kano April 29, 2012.

According to Open Doors, 4,028 Christians were killed and there were 198 church attacks in 2015 alone. From 2009 to 2014, terror attacks have resulted in the death of 11,500 Christians and destruction of 13,000 churches in Nigeria. The group also noted that 1.3 million Christians fleeing the violence have been displaced.

In response to Open Doors' report, Intersociety lamented the situation and slammed President Muhammadu Buhari's seeming inability and unwillingness to protect Christians in the country. The group called on Christian leaders to "rise to the occasion" and do something to address the relentless killings and persecution of believers.

"As we speak, none of the perpetrators has been fished out and put on trial. That is to say that Government is fully aiding and abetting the sundry ethno-religious cleansing and butcheries," said Intersociety chairman Emeka Umeagbalasi. "It also partakes circumstantially and vicariously, if not directly."

Meanwhile, former U.S. Congressman Frank Wolf spoke to The Christian Post in a phone interview and said Nigerian Christians are among the millions of displaced people in the world who feel they have been abandoned by Western churches. He said this feeling stems from international churches' failure to speak out on the issue.

Wolf, who witnessed first-hand the Nigerian Christians' difficulties, said the world seems to have forgotten about what is happening in the African nation. He observed that not many in the West are advocating for them.